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Feb. 2, 2016
 
Latino Heritage Programs at Chandler Public Library throughout March

Latino VoicesPrograms exploring local, regional and national Latino heritage and culture will be featured throughout March at the Downtown Chandler Public Library. The free public events are supported through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Library Association (ALA), as part of their “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” program.

On Saturday, March 5, the Library will host “Sharing Our Heritage: Chandler Latino Voices,” a presentation on Chandler’s vast Latino history. Individuals representing the past 100 years, including members of Chandler’s pioneering Mexican American families and those who continue to empower the community, will share their oral recollections, stories and experiences. As a visual component, banners featuring related historical photographs from the Chandler Museum will be revealed for the first time at this program before traveling to library branches, public schools and Chandler-Gilbert Community College.

On Saturday, March 19, author Stella Pope Duarte will speak on the “branches to roots” heritage of the modern-day Chicanos in her presentation Corazon Del Nopal. This talk will be enhanced by a performance from Guerrero Family Music.

In addition to the public programming support, the Chandler Public Library was provided the six-part, NEH-supported documentary film “Latino Americans,” created for PBS in 2013 by public television station WETA. The award-winning series chronicles the history of Latinos in the United States from the 16th century to present day and can be borrowed through the library.

Two episodes of the “Latino Americans” series will be screened at the Downtown Chandler Library: "Episode 5 – Pride and Prejudice" (1965-1980) on Tuesday, March 8, and "Episode 6 – Peril and Promise" (1980-2000s) on Tuesday, March 22. Dr. Christine Marìn, Emeritus Professor of History at Arizona State University, will lead discussions following both of the screenings.

“Latino Americans are the country’s largest minority group, with more than 50 million people, and still many people are unaware of their rich and varied history and culture,” said Brenda Brown, director of the City of Chandler’s Cultural Affairs Division. “Many of Chandler’s early residents built strong Latino-American neighborhoods and have contributed to our city’s culture and identity, which we want to celebrate.”

Planned programs at the Downtown Chandler Public Library will include:

 
Sharing Our Heritage: Chandler Latino Voices
Downtown Library, Copper Room South-North
Saturday, March 5, 2016, 2-3 p.m.
Celebrating the lore and legacy of Chandler’s Latino history, individuals representing the past 100 years, including members of Chandler’s pioneering Mexican American families and those who continue to empower the community, will share their oral recollections, stories and experiences.  Historical photographs from the Chandler Museum will be displayed on banners as part of an exhibit that will subsequently travel to the library branches, public schools and Chandler-Gilbert Community College, a community partner.

Prejudice and Pride, Latino Americans Film Viewing, Episode 5 (1965-1980)
Downtown Library, Copper Room South
Tuesday, March 8, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
This episode details the creation of the proud “Chicano” identity, as labor leaders organize farm workers in Arizona and California. 
The film will be followed by a facilitated discussion led by Dr. Christine Marin. Dr. Marin, professor, archivist, curator, established the Arizona State University Chicana/o Research Collection along with the Chicana/Chicano Studies Department at A.S.U.

Corazon Del Nopal:  The Power and Heart of Los Chicanos
Author Talk by Stella Pope Duarte and Music by Guerrero Family Music
Downtown Library, Copper Room South-North
Saturday, March 19, 2016, 2-3 p.m.
From the ancient ruins of the 300-year-old Aztec empire, a new nation rose in the midst of treachery, oppression and unrelenting war.  Comets, prophecies and smoking mirrors signaled their birth as they founded Tenochitlan (Mexico City), and eventually journeyed north from the Valley of Mexico to take their place in the making of America. Duarte’s riveting talk on the legacy of the modern-day Chicanos will be enhanced by a performance from Guerrero Family Music.

Peril and Promise, Latino Americans Film Viewing, Episode 6 (1980-2000s)
Downtown Library, Copper Room South
Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
This episode takes viewers through the past 30 years, with a second wave of Cubans arriving in Miami during the Mariel exodus and with hundreds of thousands Salvadorans, Nicaraguans and Guatemalans fleeing civil wars, death squads and unrest to go north into a new land — transforming the United States along the way.
The film will be followed by a facilitated discussion led by Dr. Christine Marin.
 
For more information on these and other Library programs, go to chandlerlibrary.org or call 480-782-2800.


 
 
  • Latino Americans: 500 Years of History has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association.
    National Endowment for the Humanities Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at neh.gov.
     
  • American Library Association
    The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 58,000 members in academic, public, school, government and special libraries. The mission of the American Library Association is to provide leadership for the development, promotion and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.